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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 117 (some duplicates have been removed)
to the desk. the presiding officer: the clerk will report the amendment. the clerk: mr. reid for mr. portman proposes amendment in mnumber 2012. mr. reid: i ask for the yeas and nays on that amendment just reported. the presiding officer: is there a sufficient second? there appears to be. there is. the yeas and nays are ordered. mr. reid: i have a second-degree amendment at the desk. the presiding officer: the clerk will report. the clerk: the senator from nevada, mr. reid, for mr. toomey, proposes amendment numbered 2013 to amendment number 2012. mr. reid: i have an amendment to the underlying bill, which is at the desk. the presiding officer: the clerk will report. the clerk: the senator from nevada, mr. reid, proposes an amendment numbered 14 to the language -- numbered 2014 to the language proposed to be strick tongue the substitute. mr. reid: i ask for the yeas and nays on that amendment that was just reported. the presiding officer: is there a sufficient second? there appears to be. there is. the yeas and nays are order. mr. reid: i have a second-degree amendment at the desk. the presi
a movie right now and he says why can't you get me what's her name, natalie portman, she is not natalie portman she is what's her name natalie portman because she knows next year it is going to be somebody else. >> rose: natalie portman is not like yesterday, she is not -- he is here, she is real, she is great. >> he is real but in two years. >> and disappear -- >> it will not be in two years. >> >> how about natalie portman to this movie you would have raised more money. >> now, yes, we will see about two years. but what is her name is the give away, these names they are interchangeable after a while. i mean, i don't want to embarrass her by saying three years ago this one meant something and now he doesn't or for that matter a director. i am not worth anything on the international market. i should be, i am a greater artist, you know, but. >> rose: if you say so yourself. >> if i say zero so myself, and if one else -- this time i am getting two great movies, the last two minutes. >> rose: seven holden -- >> 95 percent rotten tomatoes. >> rose: really, tyson -- >> >> rose: this movie a
"safeguarding our nation's secrets," examined the national security workforce. i will say that senator portman is tight. he will be here a little bit late and he will have to leave early. unfortunately, it's not because of the importance of this issue. it is because we've got a defense authorization bill on the floor and that's giving a lot of folks who wanted to be here today away, but we will do our best to get as much good information as we can on the record as we proceed through this so that they will have the ability to make good decisions with good information as those decisions arise. from the significant disclosures of classified information to the tragedy of the washington naval yard, it is abundantly clear to the american people that the federal government is failing to properly vet the individuals who were granted access to the agent nation's most secure facility. as we've all seen there are real-life consequences to these failures. and looking at the lessons learned, it's obvious there's no single quickfix to such a broken fixed -- system but it's about incomplete, falsified and mu
balance among legal remedies and redress. i am pleased that the senate has adopted senator portman's amendment today which i have supported that protects religious employers from retaliation by the government when they adhere to their religious convictions, and then also that clarifies the importance of protecting religious freedom as part of enda. i think that that is an improvement to the bill and i'm pleased that we have been able to advance that. i want to -- to recognize senator merkley for his leadership on this issue. i think from the very time he came here to -- to the united states senate he has approached me in discussion about advancing the enda legislation, ensuring that from the perspective of our workplaces that there is full equality, that there is no discrimination within the workplace, and senator kirk for his leadership in this initiative as well. i'm pleased that we are going to have an opportunity tomorrow to -- to hopefully advance this bill fully and finally through the floor of the united states senate. it is -- it is well past time that we as elected represe
. senator portman i think and senator kirk from illinois most recently coming out in favor of marriage equality. so i wouldn't be surprised at least if the nominee, you know, is somebody leak chris christie who sort of was able to straddle the issue a bit, not in faefr of gay marriage, certainly didn't make that one of his key. >> chris christie in the new jersey governor's race, barbara bueno saw this as his weakness, she brought it up in the debate. this is how he handled the question last month. let's play that clip. >> if my children came to me and said that they were gay, i would grab them and huck them an tell them i loved them, just like i would do with any of my children who came to me with news that they wanted to give to me that they thought were important enough to open themselves up in that way. but what i would tell them is that dad believes that marriage is between one man and one woman. that's my. >> i love you, take your time. by the way, here's my legal position. >> it seems leak such a. >> actually, i'm sorry. that's actually the opposite of what a lot of republicans
. >> rob portman says it was a difficult day for him. i think it was a difficult day for the people of toronto. rebels have admitted defeat. it ends a bloody this -- has killedthat thousands. revolutionary surrendered after congolese forces, backed by the united nations, recaptured strongholds in the east of the country. andy harding has this report. >> could this be one of the last artillery shells to scar the green hills of eastern congo? there had been conflicts here for a generation but today one major rebellion came to an end. rare victory for the soldiers, from the inventories we ragtag -- from the g army.usly ragta they were forced to give up the fight. crucial to the breakthrough where these troops from a new united nations force, working alongside the congolese army. for all of those involved in trying to stabilize the country, this kind of aggressive action that has been lacking in the past. >> this is certainly a significant step in the right direction. it has to be followed by the disarming of the other armed groups and a broader political dialogue. >> the instability in
cain, rob portman, conservative names, kelly and great news for the lgbt community. anand politics on capitol hill. >> and speaker boehner has indicated that he believes that current federal law already protects these groups. is that true? >> as a matter of fact, as you outlined in the open there, as you reported, it specifically does not, sex, gender, ethnicity, yes, and race, and federal law of course does. the republican party has a problem, and it's the same story that it's a schism, and many republicans in the establishment want to get away from social issues. they think that it's hurting them. and or tuesday night, with the social conservatives, coming close and still losing, there's more evidence of that, causing consternation among republicans. >> mike in washington. thank you very much. >>> secretary of state, john kerry, said that he's confident that a syrian peace conference is going to be announced in the next couple of days. he's now in jordan meeting with king abdulla, and he said that some clarity has been established. this despite public statements of frustration f
for the director to 2 minutes. members can speak more than once, of course. i will go with mr. portman and then esther white house in the whitehouse in the queue after him. , thank you forf your insights. you have depression -- depressing information for us. ng's do not look good. if we continue to see high rates of revenue and relatively low rates of domestic stationary spending. i have two questions one interest rates and one regarding tax revenue. if we go back to a historic level on interest rates, we have a huge problem in terms of meeting these projections you laid out. us an answergive on that, what do you consider to be the historic rate. already see a creeping up of the rate today. taxes, with regard to that tax revenues are going to be above historic levels by 2038. over the next decade, what would be the average tax as a percent of gdp? how does that compare to other decades. timeve never had a 10 year with revenue at that level. second, what would it be like in the next decade. two questions, one on interest in terms where are we of taxes as a percent of the economy and how
to two minutes not including his time in members can speak more than once of course so i see mr. portman. i will go to mr. portman and then mr. whitehouse in the queue after him. >> thank you mr. chairman and dr. elmendorf thank you for your insights this morning and as you said at the end you have kind of depressing information for us which is things don't look at and they could be even worse if we don't continue to see these relatively high rates of revenue as you said over the coming decades and continue to see these relatively low rates of domestic discretionary spending. i have two questions for you quickly. one is with regard to tax revenue someone is regard to interest rates. it seems to me if we go back to an and historical level on interest rates we have a huge problem in terms of meeting these protections that you lay out and specifically $120 billion in increased deficits so if you could give us an answer on that and what you consider to be the historical rate if we went back to that historical rate of interest and seeing a creeping up of the rate today what would be the impac
of natalie portman, robert downey jr., and jon cryer. sardi's is a famous restaurant in the broadway theater district -- the perfect place to not only interview cindy, the owner of stagedoor, but also a camper who's already in the spotlight. >> i'm playing pepper in "annie" on broadway, and it's really fun. i was 10 when i went my first time to stagedoor manor. >> a camp like stagedoor manor may not be for everyone, but the message about following your dreams certainly is. >> i would say you need to follow your heart, you need to be really determined, practice, do everything you can, and have fun, and see where it takes you. >> can we give her another round of applause? [ cheers and applause ] >> good advice for all of us. >> ever have that feeling that you've been someplace before or experienced something before when you know you haven't? it's a weird feeling called déjà vu. that's french for "already seen." so what causes it? scientists aren't exactly sure, but most rule out sci-fi explanations like momentarily crossing over into a parallel dimension. one explanation may be a misfiring i
democratic but still a socially state.vative rob portman has said i'm for same-sex marriage because his gay.is republics that come from places hat have state laws on the books but toomey it was most notable. >> were you surprised by any of those? >> toomey especially. the others make sense. illinois has been fighting for this since he came to congress. maine a big from champion of gay rights but tsunamsignals that he understands the politics of his running in will be 20 2016. he other though if a conservative, social conservative like pat toomey can the issue perhaps there are others who are seeing the polling and understand it is change. gwen: in the house if their heels are dug in does this make senate vote a show vote? >> to some 10th and it was as midterm cycle was beginning. the gay rights community loyal give a lot of money and to some it will be seen as a show vote. could be hope it tacked on to something like the defense bill and force it through the house but have generally said they are not for it. gwen: maybe there will be other votes. thank you all. we have to leave you for n
portman. as always, welcome back to the show. >> larry, thank you. >> before we do budget stuff, can i ask you, there's several bills that let you keep your insurance plan if you like it. there's senator johnson's bill and others. the democrats are in panic tizzy over what's going on and obama's unpopularity. can you just give us a sense, any of these bills serious? could they pass? will there be a vote? >> i think they're serious. i don't think they're going to work and that's what you just heard from the experts. in other words, we've already kind of gone down this path and it's very difficult to unravel the damage that's been done. 50 times more americans have lost it than gained it in enrollment. 50 times more. i want to try to help folks who are -- >> there's a renewal process. there is a renewal -- insurance renewal process. it's not as clean. but you could do it if you wanted to do it. >> what do you think -- >> who give votes to these bills? that's what i want to know. >> i don't know. since senator landrew, probably there's some interest in that. there's some of the other proposal
jersey, pat toomey of pennsylvania and rob portman of ohio. and with their votes, the bill cleared the republican filibuster and is now on a path to pass the senate once and for all on wednesday or thursday of this week. it was very dramatic. passing the senate, though, isn't enough to make it law. and the republican leadership in the house today said they will not even allow this discrimination bill to be brought up for a vote in the house. the speaker says he's against it, says the republicans will not even let the house consider it. what's weird, though, is the stated reason why they're against it. john boehner and the republican leadership in the house say they will not allow a vote on this bill because they say it's already illegal to fire someone for being gay. "they believe existing law provides these protections." existing law does not provide these protections. remember? >> in 29 states in this country, you can still get fired for not just being gay, but if your employer thinks that you're gay, you can still get fired. >> that's true! that is a true statement. whatever pol
, senator mccaskill, senator portman, begich, johnson, nellson, and senator bachus, to allow the inspector general to tap into o.p.m.'s revolving fund to perform the much needed oversight. we commend our colleagues for their good work. legislation passed the senate earlier this month. my hope is it will be signed into law by the president soon. in closing, i want to say that the vast majority of individuals who hold security clearances are honorable and trustworthy people. many of them felt called into service after 9/11 to help protect our country, and they deserve our thanks. having said that, though, we still must have a system that does a better job of rooting out those with in fairous purposes and those who have become deeply troubled and unstable. that system must identify those with behavior signals and when that system must identify those whose behavior signals are unacceptable risk to be trusted with classified information or access to sensitive federal facilities. i hope that our hearing today will help point us to a number of sensible solutions that taken together will truly imp
it on the floor, the votes would be there. there were two amendments, the rob portman amendment that was passed, by a voice vote on this religious exemption language that mand amanda was describing. how do you think of the amendments -- do you think this has been watered down in a significant way or is this still a sound piece of legislation? >> well, look, the fact that it passed the senate and is sitting in the house, if they can just get the thing passed, and get the protection there, it's a victory. just get the thing on the books, and then, if people feel that the law is too porous or isn't effective or that the religious exemption is too broad, you can go in and tinker with it. but, you know, all this conversation might be useless because of one person and that is speaker boehner. unless he allows the bill to go to a vote, you know, we're all just talking. and that effort in -- that effort in the house would be for not. >> so, mary, congresswoman, you know the republican house better than anybody at the table. you were part of the republican house. what do you think is going on in john bo
. coburn senator mccaskill senator portman begich johnson nelson and senator baucus to allow the inspector general to tap into opm's revolving fund for the purpose of reforming that much needed oversight and we commend senators tester and our colleagues for their good work. legislation passed the senate earlier this month. my hope is it will be signed into law by the president soon. in closing i want to say the vast majority of individuals who hold security clearances are honorable and trustworthy people many of them felt called to service after 9/11 to help protect their country and they deserve our thanks. having said that though we still must have a system that does a better job of rooting out those who become deeply troubled and unstable. that system must identify those with the hader signals and that system must identify those whose behavior signals and on acceptable risk to be entrusted to classified information are access to sensitive federal information. i hope that our hearing today will help point us to a number of sensible solutions that taken together would surely improve our n
of senatorrers tester, portman, mccaskill, and johnson. that hearing exposed the urgent need for additional resources at the office of personnel management, to enable that ig to conduct important oversight of background investigations. in july, our committee proved a portion of the bill sponsored by senator tester and cosponsored by dr. coburn, senator mccaskill, senator port man, johnson, nelson, and senator baucus to allow the inspector general to tap into opm's revolving fund for the purpose of performing much needed oversight, and we commend senator tester and our colleagues for their good work. legislation passed the senate earlier this month. my hope is signed into law by the president soon. in closing, i want to say that the vast majority of individuals who hold security clearances are honorable and trustworthy people. many of them felt calledded into service after 9/11 to help protect our country, and they deserve our thanks. having said that, though, we still must have a system that does a better job of rooting out those with nefarious purposes and those deeply troubled and up stab
of question marks on some of the republicans. in particular when we were looking at rob portman of ohio throughout the day yesterday as well as kelly ayotte of new hampshire and pat toomey of pennsylvania. behind the vote there was a lobbying effort on the senate floor reporters were in the gallery watching. and the three key republicans were huddling in the clerk room with a democrat from oregon the chief sponsor of the legislation and one point chuck schumer goes over there. they were working behind scenes to secure the vote so they could move forward on the bill last night. >> in working to secure the votes, did senator toomey or any republican senatorrings get any commitment for amendment votes? >> they did. so they're going -- they -- kelly ayotte and rob portman secured a vote on their amendment that deals more with antiretaliation issues or religious groups. they look as a way of strengthening protections for religious organizations in the employee nondiscrimination act. senator toomey is going have another religion-related amendment. it's going broaden the number of groups that
are done at x date has represent up to the 5 million mark. rob portman said this could have been avoided. bill: a question for you at home if you are watching. what would you suggest to make obamacare better? send us tweeted@martha maccallum and bill hemmer. blast away. send those to us. and in the meantime back to this sad sad story as it is a desperate race against time in the philippines today. the country deals with mass devastation left behind by that super typhoon. water, food, medical ply in short supply. looting is rampant. the death toll is near 2,000. that's the official number. but every one who has seen this situation thinks it will climb dramatically. survivors walk the ruins holding their hand over their faces to block it out. people who made it through the storm are worried they won't survive the aftermath. >> we have been here for so many days. look at my children. we have nothing to eat. others who got here -- we did not die from the typhoon but we'll die here. martha: william lajeunesse is streaming live. >> reporter: the philippine and u.s. military are desperately try
's secrets, examining the national security work force. i will say that senator portman will be here late and will have to leave early, unfortunately. it's not because of the importance of this issue. it is because we've got a defense authorization bill on the floor, and that's keeping a lot of the folks who wanted to be here today away, but we will do our best to get as much good information as we can on the record as we proceed through this so that they'll have the ability to make good decisions with good information as those decisions arise. from the significant dischow sures of classified information to the tragedy at the washington naval yard, it is abun adaptly clear to the american people and that the federal government is failing to properly vet the individuals who are granted access to our nation's most sensitive information and secure facilities. >> it's about agencies improperly adjudicating clearances and about pure volume. today, there's nearly 5 million individuals with a security clearance. you heard me right, 5 million. there are no indications that number will decrease an
sensitive positions do we have? i've got to be quiet here. i'll come back. senator portman? >> thank you, chairman. think about that question. first, thanks for holding the hearing. this, as you know, our second hearing we have held. there also has been a hearing at the full committee level on this same issue. i think we have all acknowledge there is a need for significant reform with regard to the security clearance process. and this is not our last hearing, so we will continue to work on this. we appreciate you being here today and giving input. sorry i'm a little late. this is kind of a crazy time i know with the budget conference going on. but i am pleased we made a little progress, even in the last couple of months. we have legislation that senator tester and i introduced that passed, call score act, and he gives important oversight abilities on this, too. the inspector general and opm -- i think you are familiar with. we are actually working on additional legislation now that we think will also be able to move pretty quickly because it is bipartisan and i think it makes the system
. obama administration announces new contracts with cgi, not kidding. plus senator rob portman is here to talk about it next. without the thinking that makes it real? what's a vision without the expertise to execute it... and the financing toake it grow? whatever your goal, it can change more than your business. it can change the future. that's why, at barclays, our ambition is to always realize yours. >>> northwestern university taking heat lots of it. especially uniforms its football team plans to wear next week. the team is trading in purple uniform for red, white, and blue. here is the issue. the special uniform also features what looks like blood splattered american flags so. why would northwestern wear what appears to be blood splattered american flags in a game against michigan. the university says it's a show of support for the wounded warrior project proceeds from a post game auction of the jerseys goes to wounded warriors. critics don't like it calling the bloody flag look crass and a bit too much. tonight northwestern is apologizing for any misconceptions we want you to be t
exemptions. senator portman wanted an amendment that i believe just moments before i came on here actually passed. we felt it was unnecessary, but it went forward. and it passed. all of the talking points against this -- if you look at what speaker boehner's spokesperson said, those are the talking points that come straight from the right-wing, anti-gay, homophobic extremists. that's not the view of most republicans. most of the republican electorate. and it's not the view of most republicans in this building behind me. i hope the speaker is going to realize we're in a new day in this country. this is a basic american value. i think increasingly elected officials, democrat and republican, are going to start paying a price when they're on the wrong side of history, especially on a piece of legislation that has such broad and wide-reaching support in this country. >> yeah, i mean, especially as the gop sort of presumes or takes the mantle on being the party of business. of the fortune 500 companies, 88% of them prevent discrimination against gay and lesbian employees. we are there. this sort
, senator mccaskill, senator portman, begich, johnson, nelson, and senator baucus, to allow the inspector general to tap into o.p.m.'s revolving fund to perform the much needed oversight. we commend our colleagues for their good work. legislation passed the senate earlier this month. my hope is it will be signed into law by the president soon. in closing, i want to say that the vast majority of individuals who hold security clearances are honorable and trustworthy people. many of them felt called into service after 9/11 to help protect our country, and they deserve our thanks. having said that, though, we still must have a system that does a better job of rooting out those with nefarious purposes and those who have become deeply troubled and unstable. that system must identify those with behavior signals and when that system must identify those whose behavior signals are unacceptable risk to be trusted with classified information or access to sensitive federal facilities. i hope that our hearing today will help point us to a number of sensible solutions that taken together will truly impr
. processes that will help us deal with future lapses in spending in the way that senator portman's bill has proposed. processes to help us deal with the debt ceiling as we reach the debt ceiling. and hopefully, help us reduce the stress we put on the economy in the political battles that we have here. we have a remarkable opportunity to fix some of the rules and processes by which we function in this conference in a way that will help us protect the savings we now have and achieve further and greater savings as we move forward. i would encourage us to focus on laying the foundation for much greater and effective results as we move forward beyond the activities of this committee. thank you. >> senator sanders. >> thank you very much. i think this has been a very good discussion and i hope that we can continue to have more open discussions. let me begin my remarks with a radical proposal. let's listen to what the american people are telling us. what are they telling us? in poll after poll, they're saying do not cut social security. do not cut medicare. do not cut medicaid. that is what all th
. senator rob portman who was a tea party candidate in ohio in 2010, senator mark kirk, iliana ross letanon from florida. i could go on and on. there are plenty and plenty of them >> both in elected office, former elected and candidates. so that's changing. and as far as the point about demographics and sort of gay americans being one of the demographics republicans should appeal to more, i would note actually that is one of the demographics where republicans did improve our standing between 2004 and 2008. you c you can see if you go to the website gay patriot. it has breakdowns on john mccain, who was more moderate on these issues actually did improve our standing. >> we will stop you right there. coming up, if the g.o.p. is fighting an internal' eternal war, how do they end it? we will continue that part of the conversation when we come back. stay with us. for instance, could striking workers in greece delay >> i can no longer be a member of the republican party. make no mistake. i have not left the republican party. it left me. i cannot tolerate a political party that demeans texans base
. >> they are beautiful, brand new planes. we reached out to senators brown and portman, but got no response. another option here, they could sell the planes to an ally. based on what's happened in the past, it could be another bad deal for taxpayers. it will be unlikely that the pentagon will sell them for anything close to the original price. >> coming up after the break, young victims of the storm, why children are less likely to make it in the aftermath and why girls have a worse chance than boys. we'll discuss the desperate decisions, coming up next. >> knew snapshot of stories making headlines. unif i believe bleak returns for obamacare. after six weeks of business, a new report in the washington post says only about 40,000 people in 36 different exchanges have actually signed up on healthcare.gov. the administration's goal was 500,000 enrolled customers, falling quite short of that goal. >> the big apple beats the windy city in the blueprint battle, one world trade center surpassing chicago's willis tower. it is now the nation's tallest building. officials decided that the spire is actually fi
see mr. portman, i'll go with mr. portman and then mr. whitehouse in the queue after him. >> thank you, mr. chairman. director elmendorf, thank you for your insights this morning and, as you said at the end, you have kind of depressing information for us, which is things don't look good and they can be even worse until we continue to see these relatively high rates of revenue, as you said, over the coming decades and continue to see these relative low rates of congressional discretionary spending. i have two questions for you, quickly, one regarding to tax revenues, one regarding interest rates. you did not mention interest rates. it seems to me if we go back to an historical level on interest rates we also have a huge problem in terms of meeting these projections you lay out, specifically about $120 billion a year increase in deficit, so if you could give us an answer on that. what do you consider to be the the historic rate, if we went back to that historic rate of interest and we already see it creeping up of the rate today, what would be the impact on the deficit, and second with r
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 117 (some duplicates have been removed)